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Topic : 08/01 Extreme Highs and Lows

Number of Replies: 1257
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Created on : Friday, March 03, 2006, 12:43:32 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1

(Original Air Date: 03/07/06) Dr. Phil explores the ups and downs of bipolar disorder. This illness takes its victims on an emotional rollercoaster ride -- from elation to extreme irritability, intense rage, or devastating depression. First, Cathy was diagnosed with Bipolar II, 10 years ago and claims she goes from zero to psycho in 15 seconds. Dr. Phil takes a look at the toll her disorder takes on her two boys, and brings the family together for a dramatic moment of emotional healing. Then, during various manic episodes, Fred has stolen a taxi, crashed into a Starbucks, and climbed to the top of a church. He hears voices and believes that movie stars like Denzel Washington and Robert De Niro are talking to him through their movies. Still, Fred thinks he’s ready to move out of his parents’ house and live on his own for good … but should his family let him? Talk about the show here.

 

Find out what happened on the show.

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August 15, 2006, 11:26 am CDT

My ongoing recovery

Just wanted to share what often works for me in my recovery of being diagnosed a bp I

exercise everyday, even if you think it will kill you....a walk is still a walk...get out of bed.

eat well, limit sugars and fats and processed foods.

eat as much fish, salmon as possible

take YOUR Meds, prove to YOUR doctors that they do not have a fool for a patient!!!

take omega 3 supplements.

eats leafy green veggies.

talk to your family and friends as often as possible.

surrender your condition to God, as He is in control, not you.  We are all on our own journey and there is much to learn from EVERYTHING....even the "darker" moments.

Being mentally ill means you have been touched by God....we know it...others do not...someday they will be touched too.  Relax.....everything will be all right.

Open your mind mentally, read as much as you can on your disorder.

Stay in balance, mentally, physically, and spiritually.  It is easy to say, but hard to practice.

Read Mary Ellen Copelands Wellness Recovery Action Plan booklet

 

Peace.

 
August 15, 2006, 11:18 pm CDT

Take your meds

Take your meds is not a very popular title for people with bipolar disorder. I am one. I have been mostly on lithium for 20  years now. When I have tried to go off of it, because I missed some part of my self, or hated putting any drug in my body.... I eventually ended up back on it. For some strange reason, my body needs it. And I do well when I take it.

 

I have graduated from university, and been in the teaching profession for a decade now. I maintain my relationships. I have so much more to offer when I am stable, to my students, my family, my love life, my church, etc.

 

I just wanted to encourage y'all to comply. Your brain can repair itself and build good pathways for the neurotransmitters, if you just stay on your meds. You owe it to yourself to be the best you, you can be. You are somebody! You are special! You have unique gifts and talents that only you can bring to the world. You have people who love and care about you. We are in very good company with other bipolar people, Abraham Lincoln, Sir Winston Churchill, Michelangelo and so on. When I am on my meds, no one knows that I have this disorder. I am able to live a normal productive life like others. When I am off of my meds, everyone knows, even strangers, and my life is chaos and hospitals.

 

I dream that maybe one day, I won't have to take my meds, but until that day, (and only in consultation with my doctor)...I stay on them. I owe it to myself, and so do you.

 

Blessings to all my brothers and sisters out there suffering with bipolar disorder. It's an illness that's treatable. I will not let it conqueor me, it is not unbeatable. Keep hope alive. You are beautiful.

 
August 17, 2006, 8:25 pm CDT

in the genes

Quote From: lampliter

      

        Is Bi-Polar hereditary? We can trace it back several generations in the family. 

Bipolar ll disorder is still being studied but it is well thought that this type of disorder is in your genes. There is parts that are both genetic and environmental. Having someone with bipolar ll disorder gives you a genetic disposition to develop bipolar. There is currently a lot of twin studies that are going on and I can recommend you go look at these sites if you wish to find out more information 

 Bipolar Genetics Project
Bipolar genetics research taking place at the University of Pittsburg.
http://www.pitt.edu/~nimga/

 

Columbia Bipolar Genetic Study
at New york State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University
http://www.bipolar.hs.columbia.edu

 

More about Bipolar Genetics
Some interesting interviews also available
http://www.bipolargenes.org/

 

UCSD Bipolar Genetic Research
at University of California San Diego bipolar disorder genetic research
http://www.bipolar.ucsd.edu/

 

take care

lisa

 
August 20, 2006, 9:00 am CDT

My best friend has it

My good friend of 15 years has it.  I have always been there for her, so I thought.

Well,  in January she got married without inviting me.  This is the last straw.  I

can no longer be her friend.   She is 45,  acts childlike,   has migraines,  in and

out of hospitals.  I am often the only one that visits her at the hospitals  (besides family), 

I  kept in touch, offer support, to the point I am  feeling like I am stalking her.

I love her un-conditionally,  she is my friend.    What can I do?     I have seen her

do great when she excersizes,  she gives up,  it's a viscious roller-coaster.

I am praying for me to be more tolerant.  I am praying for her.

 
August 21, 2006, 1:07 pm CDT

Helpful websites

Please take a look at

 

NAMI.ORG

national alliance on mental illness

 

and

 

WebMD.com

 

Don't give up.  Take it a day at a time, a moment at a time is even better.

Be grateful for what you do have.

 

Exercise and strengthen the mind every day.

Singer Ziggy Marley put it best..."mind control, corrupt your thoughts, destruction of your soul."

We must, diligently, work on controlling and God willing eliminate our negative thoughts.  It is a battle worth waging.  This suffering is only temporary, please know that your life will get better.

 

I will pray for it.

 

Peace.

 
August 21, 2006, 1:21 pm CDT

You doing ALL anyone can do

Quote From: porkcp

My good friend of 15 years has it.  I have always been there for her, so I thought.

Well,  in January she got married without inviting me.  This is the last straw.  I

can no longer be her friend.   She is 45,  acts childlike,   has migraines,  in and

out of hospitals.  I am often the only one that visits her at the hospitals  (besides family), 

I  kept in touch, offer support, to the point I am  feeling like I am stalking her.

I love her un-conditionally,  she is my friend.    What can I do?     I have seen her

do great when she excersizes,  she gives up,  it's a viscious roller-coaster.

I am praying for me to be more tolerant.  I am praying for her.

You are praying.  Not only for her, but also for you.  Both are critical.  She needs God to walk with her and to bring her closer to Him, which He is doing.  And you need to pray for your continued strength and abundant love for your friend, even though you do not always agee with her behaviors(like not inviting you to the wedding). 

 

The best thing my family does for me when I am suffering my greatest, sometimes in the hospital sometimes not, is just to LISTEN in a non-judgmental manner.  Don't tell me what to do.....just talk with me......ask questions.....strive to understand rather than to be understood.....share insights and observations.....ask me if I am doing my requisite action items when I am breaking down or in crisis......and lastly ask "what can I do for you to recover?"  The answer from me most likely would be to set a time to talk again....but that's just me.

 

Be good to yourself.

Peace.

 
August 21, 2006, 1:29 pm CDT

thank you

Quote From: tjpearson

Take your meds is not a very popular title for people with bipolar disorder. I am one. I have been mostly on lithium for 20  years now. When I have tried to go off of it, because I missed some part of my self, or hated putting any drug in my body.... I eventually ended up back on it. For some strange reason, my body needs it. And I do well when I take it.

 

I have graduated from university, and been in the teaching profession for a decade now. I maintain my relationships. I have so much more to offer when I am stable, to my students, my family, my love life, my church, etc.

 

I just wanted to encourage y'all to comply. Your brain can repair itself and build good pathways for the neurotransmitters, if you just stay on your meds. You owe it to yourself to be the best you, you can be. You are somebody! You are special! You have unique gifts and talents that only you can bring to the world. You have people who love and care about you. We are in very good company with other bipolar people, Abraham Lincoln, Sir Winston Churchill, Michelangelo and so on. When I am on my meds, no one knows that I have this disorder. I am able to live a normal productive life like others. When I am off of my meds, everyone knows, even strangers, and my life is chaos and hospitals.

 

I dream that maybe one day, I won't have to take my meds, but until that day, (and only in consultation with my doctor)...I stay on them. I owe it to myself, and so do you.

 

Blessings to all my brothers and sisters out there suffering with bipolar disorder. It's an illness that's treatable. I will not let it conqueor me, it is not unbeatable. Keep hope alive. You are beautiful.

It is so baffling, I am coming to realization that we should be offering a 12-step program for recovering (and I use that word intentionally) BP's.  It is manageable, but takes perserverence and persistence and concerted effort to thrive.

 

I am grateful to be alive.  I am also grateful to be BP, cause I have run into other people who are less fortunate.  And I appreciate my newly discovered talents.

 

Let's keep doing the best we can.

Peace

 
August 22, 2006, 9:30 am CDT

Difficult to Manage

I have had BPII all my life (I am now 38).  I was diagnosed only 6 years ago, and my life is hell.

 

Just admitted myself into a hospital for the first time ever a few weeks ago, and it did help, but I really wish they knew more about my brain.  I am signing up for the Brain Scan that Dr. Phil had on his show recently, although I have no clue how I will pay for it.  If I ask Daddy for another 10 grand, he is gonna need a doctor instead of me :-)

 

I came to the conclusion that this disease has be so hard on my wife of 11 years,  and my 7 yr old son, that I was seriously considering just driving off and never returning.  So, I checked myself into the hospital, hoping to get a brain scan, but, it's only out in California and CO.  Bummer.

 

It really sucks to have to "Act" your whole life, because in the end, you just cannot do it anymore, you fall flat on your face;  It's hard to maintain the Act when you are stareing into the cement :-)

 

Glen

 
August 22, 2006, 2:01 pm CDT

encouragement

Quote From: gbehrend

I have had BPII all my life (I am now 38).  I was diagnosed only 6 years ago, and my life is hell.

 

Just admitted myself into a hospital for the first time ever a few weeks ago, and it did help, but I really wish they knew more about my brain.  I am signing up for the Brain Scan that Dr. Phil had on his show recently, although I have no clue how I will pay for it.  If I ask Daddy for another 10 grand, he is gonna need a doctor instead of me :-)

 

I came to the conclusion that this disease has be so hard on my wife of 11 years,  and my 7 yr old son, that I was seriously considering just driving off and never returning.  So, I checked myself into the hospital, hoping to get a brain scan, but, it's only out in California and CO.  Bummer.

 

It really sucks to have to "Act" your whole life, because in the end, you just cannot do it anymore, you fall flat on your face;  It's hard to maintain the Act when you are stareing into the cement :-)

 

Glen

I have BP 1, have had it all my life, but diagnosed 10 years ago.

 

My disorder has caused much pain for my husband of 25 years and to my 3 boys.  The oldest one is now clued in on just what is going on.  The younger two have and age-appropriate understanding of my disorder.

 

New medications have made me much more stable, and hopefully, "Oger Mom" is gone for good.  Although a brain scan might give a more complete picture, you already know what you have.  If you are feeling unstable on your current meds, do some research on newer meds (I'm on Lamictal and Abilify), and ask your doctor about them.

 

Hang in there.  Your wife obviously loves you and is committed to you, or she would have taken off a long time ago.  Your son needs his dad.

 

Whenever I fall into a deep depression, I can "act" normal, even though my feelings are in the toilet.  It would scare people to know how I really feel.  When I am manic, it is hard to act normal.  I am giddy, make a lot of jokes (not all of them nice), and feel bad later, when I realize what I have said.

 

Please leave the car keys in your pocket and stick around. 

 

 With all of my health problems and mental health issues, people have asked my husband why he stays married to me. (what a rude question!)  My husband replies that we vowed to be there for each other "in sickness and in health", and we are both committed to keeping that vow...25 years now!  Living with my husband isn't always so rosy either..he has his own health problems and mental health issues.  We just understand each other.  My husband often recognizes my manic moods before I do.

 

Remember, your family loves you and needs you.

 

I'll keep you in my prayers.

 
August 22, 2006, 2:06 pm CDT

keep being her friend

Quote From: porkcp

My good friend of 15 years has it.  I have always been there for her, so I thought.

Well,  in January she got married without inviting me.  This is the last straw.  I

can no longer be her friend.   She is 45,  acts childlike,   has migraines,  in and

out of hospitals.  I am often the only one that visits her at the hospitals  (besides family), 

I  kept in touch, offer support, to the point I am  feeling like I am stalking her.

I love her un-conditionally,  she is my friend.    What can I do?     I have seen her

do great when she excersizes,  she gives up,  it's a viscious roller-coaster.

I am praying for me to be more tolerant.  I am praying for her.

Don't give up on your friend.  Encourage her to have her doctor help her find the right combination of medictaions.  Keep praying for her.  I'm sure she really appreciated your committment to her, even if she doesn't show it.  Migraines are horrible.  Bipolar disorder is horrible to live with.  Keep being her friend.  The rollercoaster between mania and depression makes a person inconsistent in the motivation department.  When she is doing well, she is probably manic...mania is fun.  Depression isn't fun at all, and all hope and ambition is lost.  God bless you for being her friend.  I'll pray for you.
 
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