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Topic : 09/28 Overmedicating America: The Cruise Controversy

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Created on : Friday, September 23, 2005, 04:45:47 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1

When Tom Cruise gave his opinion about the drugging of America, he created a firestorm of controversy. Are we an overmedicated nation? Dave and Jill feel as if their 7-year-old son is holding them hostage in their own home. He's on three medications, but his uncontrollable fits of rage are destroying their marriage. Is this a real medical issue or a parenting problem? Then, two women with powerful personal stories debate the "Cruise controversy." They both think their opinion is right, but what does Dr. Phil think? Plus, an outraged father confronts his ex-wife and demands that she stop medicating their 9-year-old son. Talk about the show here.

 

Find out what happened on the show.

 

More September 2005 Show Boards.


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October 23, 2005, 11:51 am CDT

Hey Jen

Quote From: toaobb12

I had to jump in.......... 

  

I take my meds every day like I am supposed to, yet I absolutely can't stand it. I do it though, to feel and be somewhat  "normal". If I didn't take them as perscribed, then I would be aggressive and rude, which would in fact, affect many parts of my daily life. My relationship with Thom, my kids, neighbors, fellow students, my professor. You get the gist.  

  

I am always a little zany and off the wall, but that is my sense of humor. I have changed somewhat. I am not a doormat for anyone. When, i was in the depths of depression, it was a free for all.  

  

My problem is with my coping skills............I have them, but do I use them when I'm supposed to? Not Really.  For example....when I get pissed off by someone, 9 times out of 10, I will go off on them. CBT goes out the window, hon. It's the last thing on my mind. If you are doing something dumb, I wil tell you how stupid you are. Is it mean? Well hell yes!!!! Is it rational?, Prob not. 

Although, it is usually in the back of my mind about the consequences. When the rage takes hold, it is hard to deal with anything, BUT that.  

  

If I sound all for the drugs, its because they saved my life. Why wouldn't I be grateful? (and I'm not programmed by the docs and pills). I guarantee you,if not for them, I would be sitting in a jail cell, awaiting trial for murder. (not my kids).  How can that not be a good thing? 

  

Jen 

  

  

You said exactly what is true. 

  

I do know that no matter how old Emily is she will probably not be able to be off her meds. Because like you said she also loses all the therapy and coping skills once she hits the "rage zone" 

  

I am all for drugs if they are making one better. Emily is definelty better with meds than without. The only med she cannto tolerate is an anti-d, which is a commont hing I am finding in bipoalr people especially kids. 

  

Sorry if I souned like I thought one day because of coping skills she would be able to just *poof* be done with meds. It is wishful thinking but not reality. 

  

Hope you are having a good weekend, 

Tam 

 
October 23, 2005, 8:47 pm CDT

09/28 Overmedicating America: The Cruise Controversy

Quote From: badtrip

Brain scans are not based on a normal population, there is not enough data to support them yet, and a New York Times article from a few days ago covered this topic, saying that doctors admit you can't use them for diagnosing depression or other psychological disorders like ADHD, etc. The brain scan can be affected by whether the patient is sitting or lying. If you are not using an area of your brain, it will not light up as much, if you are, it will light up a lot. It is simple. So just because your brain scan is dark, doesn't mean you are depressed or have ADHD. It just means you aren't using it at the time. It doesn't mean you can't use it, just that you aren't. Depressed individuals do not have the inability to feel happy because of a brain malfunction, they are depressed due to circumstance, and doctors need to be real teachers and not just druggers. People recover not from having their minds blunted, but from creating positive outlooks, having love and interesting lives, and having others help them realize how to heal and cope.  

If you want to use personal anecdotes as examples of proof that the drugs work, why don't you consider the 60% of people for whom the drug does not work, or the equal group of people in clinical trials for whom an active placebo worked just as well, and the many people who died because of "medication?" For example I have a relative who recently started taking antidepressants, has no insight whatsoever into what should really help, and has only gotten more depressed and more sad and more negative and pessimistic on the drug. But I am sure you wouldn't consider that proof that they don't work. 

Some people try to use brain scans to diagnose and show evidence of improvement, but so many experts are admitting that you can't use brain scans to diagnose disorders other than parkinson's and other things like MS or alzheimer's which have a degenerative aspect, and the only other thing those are good for is finding tumors. I posted this in a previous message which was a quotation from a neuroscientist friend and you can also find it elsewhere. I think of brain scans as a lot like a thermal imaging scan of the body. You can't diagnose a psychological disorder on the basis of size of areas of the brain or which blood is flowing where. If a fat person had their body scanned, many organs would appear larger and hotter, but that doesn't make them healthier. A heart scan can show you where blood flows which is important, but only because you want to make sure the heart is not too big or full of blockages. You can't get down to a person's thoughts and behaviors and see what is going wrong based on an image of a brain. Psychology should be all about healing the spirit but instead people blame everything on a chemical imbalance that is not evident in any living human patient. The only chemical imbalances that can be treated are those that are evident from other areas of the body, i.e. hormones. Neurotransmitter targeting drugs affect the way the entire brain works, and incidentally they affect the body as well. Serotonin is key in development and health of smooth muscle tissue such as heart tissue, etc. 

Last night I visited a very sad website called www.ritalindeath.com. I did not know that ritalin could kill you with long term use. This one was not a suicide as far as I can tell, it was just that ritalin ruined this boy's body. 

Is your mom taking her antidepressant regularly? You're not supposed to start and stop it suddenly over and over, either take it every day or slowly cut it down and stop taking it. That is dangerous. I can't see why you would say she doesn't go through withdrawals if she hasn't stopped it before. Antidepressants have a longer half life than Ritalin so you don't go through daily withdrawal like you do with ritalin, which is cleared from the body in one day. To feel the withdrawal from an antidepressant you need to stop taking it for more than a day, and sometimes more than a few weeks before withdrawal sets in. All antidepressants are addictive in some sense, worse for some people than others, because all have withdrawal effects. They are similar to cocaine and LSD and PCP in what they do to your body. 

  

Yes my mom takes her medication regularly. but she has had to stoip once or twice due to other things, but only when her dr said to and it was due to some surgery she had.  

My son is not currently on ritalin. however all medicines can cause adverse effects over time with years of use.  I am not trying to down play the seriousness of the adverse effects.  My son has a very lving support system all around him not just at home but at school and church also. He is very active,  has a wonderful outlook, and is learning how to cope. Healling is coming and I have every bit of faith that he will not need the medicine forever.  Not  everyone has the same reactions is all I am trying to say. I don't want anyone to just hear the negatives and be scared to try something that might actually help theirselves or a loved one like i was. All I ever heard was the negative until I met people who went through it to that had the positive thing to say also. 

 
October 24, 2005, 12:50 am CDT

09/28 Overmedicating America: The Cruise Controversy

Quote From: tammyo1973

She would have not done this HAD SHE BEEN ON HER MEDS!!! 

  

  

You can't say that because you don't even know how long she had been off her meds. It could have been a day, it could have been two weeks, but the drugs don't immediately leave your system and withdrawal is often worse than dose adjustment. Withdrawal symptoms can take weeks or months. 

The sad thing is that even with all those drugs that are supposed to help, they don't always do what they are supposed to and often they make things worse. I don't know how you can say with such certainty that if she had been taking her meds she wouldn't have done anything crazy. It was when I was taking my meds that I felt the worst.  

So it seems that even with all the talk about how people try to understand each other's view point, it still comes down to the basic idea of "these meds save lives." 

Well, they may for some people make them feel like it is saving their lives, but others, it is killing them and making them kill. 

  

 
October 24, 2005, 2:17 pm CDT

Suicide Rate Unchanged in 10 Yrs - Articles

Thought some of you might find this interesting... 

  

Suicide Rate Unchanged in 10 Years--JAMA / AMA Considers Stand Against Warning Labels on Antidepressants

Thu, 9 Jun 2005

A major report in the Journal of the American Medical Association shatters all claims about the effectiveness of antidepressants as a treatment for the prevention of suicide. A comparison of the suicide data in the US between 1990-1992 and 2001-2003, by two Harvard led surveys is a stunning reality check. [1] The evidence is compelling:

"No significant changes occurred between 1990-1992 and 2001-2003 in suicidal ideation (2.8% vs 3.3%; P=.43), plans (0.7% vs 1.0%; P=.15), gestures (0.3% vs 0.2%; P=.24), or attempts (0.4%-0.6%; P=.45), whereas conditional prevalence of plans among ideators increased significantly (from 19.6% to 28.6%; P=.04), and conditional prevalence of gestures among planners decreased significantly (from 21.4% to 6.4%; P=.003)." At the same time, treatment increased dramatically:

"the enormous increase in treatment of emotional problems in the decade between the 2 surveys did not reduce the disparities in risk of suiciderelated behaviors.".

"Despite a dramatic increase in treatment, no significant decrease occurred in suicidal thoughts, plans, gestures, or attempts in the United States during the 1990s."

This major government sponsored study surveyed 9708 (English speaking) people aged 18 to 54 years compared the suicidal behavior data from the 1990-1992 National Comorbidity Survey (NCS) and the 2001-2003 National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R).

"There are approximately 3000 suicide ideators per 100 000 population and 500 suicide attempters per 100 000 population in the United States each year compared with only 14 suicide completers per 100 000 population. No statistically significant differences were found between the NCS and the NCS-R in the 12-month prevalence of any of the 4 outcomes: suicidal ideation suicide plans, suicide gestures."

Try as they did, the authors could not explain away the evidence that antidepressants have failed to demonstrate their effectiveness as suicide prevention treatments:

"It is not clear how to interpret the finding that suicide-related behaviors did not decrease when treatment increased dramatically. Completed suicides decreased by about 6% during this period. The increase in treatment might have played a part in this trend, although county-level analysis shows no overall association between amount of treatment, as indicated by per-capita number of antidepressant prescriptions, and the suicide rate.35 If increased treatment did play a part in the decrease in the suicide rate, then why did we not see a comparable decrease in suicide-related behaviors?"

The authors acknowledged that their findings are corroborated by "other information" which "argues against the possibility that the increase in treatment prevented an increase that would otherwise have occurred in suicide-related behaviors. Specifically, randomized controlled trials find only modest effects of treatment in reducing suicidality, even with optimal regimens."

The media's failure to report these these important findings to the public may be an indication of the media's financial dependence on drug company advertising.

AHRP calls for a moratorium on all screening for depression intitiatives which are falsely promoted as suicide prevention interventions. TeenScreen disseminates false information and leads to increased prescriptions for antidepressants. Inasmuch as there is absolutely no scientific-medical evidence that screening children for premumed mental disorders will benefit children, TeenScreen should be off limits from America's schools.

A news report in the Chicago Tribune (below) reveals that the American Medical Association is seriously considering adopting a resolution proposed by a contingent of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) calling for the AMA to take a position AGAINST the FDA required Black Box warnings on antidepressant labels about the increased suicide risk for children prescribed an antidepressant.

"Those behind the proposal say it is designed to combat a recent, rapid decline in prescriptions" for children. Medco reported a 10% decline in prescribing SSRI antidepressants since disclosure of the suicide risk.

Perhaps this is the most appalling indicator confirming that the medical establishment has become a servant of the drug industry (much like pimps).

The fact that the scientific evidence has failed to demonstrate that antidepressants offer any benefit greater than placebo for children, and the fact that SSRI's pose a twofold increased suicide risk for children and adolescents, is apparentlhy of no concern to the 35,000 psychiatrists who oppose the warnings.

This irresponsible move should disabuse those who had the illusion that either the AMA or the APA is concerned with enhancing the practice of medicine, once regarded as the healing profession. The AMA sells its list of doctors to the pharmaceutical industry--in the year 2000, the price was $20 million. [2] This list helps drug companies track doctors' prescribing habits so that sales representatives can tailor their marketing pitch to individual doctors.

Organizations such as the AMA and the APA are primarily (solely) lobbying organizations for doctors and the drug industry: their goal is to ensure that both drug companies and doctors make a lot of money. Since writing prescriptions increases profits for drug manufacturers and increases income for doctors, the AMA and the APA promotes prescription drugs and jealously guards doctors's exclusive right to prescribe--even if the drugs are lethal and ineffective.

Chicago Tribune
AMA to consider stand against warning labels on antidepressants
BY BRUCE JAPSEN

CHICAGO - (KRT) - The American Medical Association will consider taking a stance against a controversial Food and Drug Administration decision to add stiff warnings about antidepressant use among teens and children at its conference in Chicago this month.

Those behind the proposal say it is designed to combat a recent, rapid decline in prescriptions and ensure children and adolescents are getting proper treatment for depression.

But critics predict confusion will reign if the nation's largest doctor's group opposes the FDA and declares the agency has been too stern on antidepressants - especially during a time the agency is under criticism for lax oversight of drug safety.

Last fall the FDA ordered drug makers to place the highest warning, a so-called "black box" label, on antidepressants after a public outcry and government hearings in which some parents said they believed the drugs played a role in their children's suicide. The new label warns of increased "suicidal thinking and behavior" in children and adolescents being treated with antidepressants.

Since the FDA began reviewing widely prescribed drugs such as Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil and Celexa antidepressant usage is down more than 10 percent among patients under age 18, according to a study by Medco Health Solutions Inc. The pharmacy benefit company found usage down 16 percent for the same age group in the fourth quarter, "traditionally the time of the year when antidepressant use peaks," the Medco study said.

The decline concerns Dr. David Fassler, who is on the board of the American Psychiatric Association and is a voting AMA delegate representing the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

"Are the right kids getting the right treatment?" said Fassler, adding that he didn't feel the decision was supported by available scientific data. "I worry that it will reduce access to effective and appropriate treatment for children and adolescents suffering from depression."

Fassler's group, the 36,000-member American Psychiatric Association, is among those concerned about the affects of the black-box warning. The large organization could have some clout with the AMA's 543-member policy-making House of Delegates when it meets the week of June 19 in Chicago to discuss the proposal, one of dozens the group will consider. The House represents nearly 250,000 doctor members of the AMA.

Though the resolution's prospects are unknown, some observers say it is irresponsible of the AMA to even consider the proposal.

"For the AMA to move on this issue is irresponsible and confusing," said Dr. Sidney Wolfe, director of Public Citizen's health research group. "It is extraordinarily demeaning to both doctors and patients that a black box warning, that would lead to safer use of the drugs, is not a good idea. The black box warning is an attempt to balance out the known risks with the benefits of the drug and decrease the chance of a patient having an adverse reaction."

A black box warning does not prevent doctors from prescribing a certain medication. It highlights risks and typically makes physicians think twice about using the product.

Any move to water down the labeling or eliminate the black box warning is sure to meet stiff opposition from some doctors, particularly pediatricians who fought for the new warnings last year.

"I think the black box warning is very reasonable and factually correct, and I don't see any reason to change it," said Dr. Thomas Newman, a pediatrician and University of California at San Francisco professor of epidemiology and biostatistics. He was on the FDA advisory panel that recommended the agency add the new warning labels.

Reached Wednesday, two of the largest makers of antidepressants, Pfizer Inc., the maker of Zoloft, and GlaxoSmithKline Plc. the maker of Paxil, declined to comment on the proposal before the AMA.

The drugs certainly have support among the medical profession, particularly in the field of psychiatry. And a report from the AMA's Council on Scientific Affairs recently completed a report concluding that the FDA should re-evaluate the impact of its decision.

"This product labeling should not be interpreted in such a way that would decrease access to patients who might benefit from these drugs," the report said.

The AMA forum could lead to a more unified voice among doctors regarding the controversial use of antidepressants among children, some doctors said.

"Are the right kids getting the right treatment?" Fassler asked. "That is where we need to place the emphasis." Others, meanwhile, say parts of the AMA report advocating additional studies will also be a valuable exercise to put before the FDA.

"The FDA should evaluate the impact of the changes that it makes," said University of California-San Francisco's Dr. Newman. "The FDA takes actions with certain goals in mind and it would be a good idea for them to evaluate whether they accomplish the goals they were intended to accomplish."

If doctors support the idea, it would be a tug in the opposite direction for the FDA - an agency recently criticized for not being vigilant enough in ensuring the safety of drugs after they hit the market in the wake of the withdrawals of pain medications Vioxx and Bextra.

Merck & Co. pulled Vioxx from the market last fall after a study found it increased a patient's risk of heart attack and stroke. In April, Pfizer pulled Bextra, because of similar concerns, as regulatory scrutiny heightened. The FDA reportedly knew of heart risks from Vioxx years before.

THE WASHINGTON POST
June 7, 2005
Suicide rate unchanged in 10 years

Despite a dramatic increase in the psychiatric treatment of emotional disorders during the past decade, there has been no decrease in the rate of suicidal thoughts and behavior among adults, according to a highly respected federal survey.

People who attempt suicide were far more likely to be treated, especially with antidepressants such as Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft, in 2001-03 compared with 1990-92. But the rates of suicidal ideation, gestures and attempts remained essentially unchanged, said researchers from Harvard Medical School and elsewhere, who recently published their findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The striking finding may have several explanations, they said: Reductions in suicidal behavior as a result of treatment might be offset by increases in such behavior triggered by the drugs in some people -- the Food and Drug Administration last year warned of such effects in children, but has not said the problem affects adults.

It is possible suicidal behavior would have increased without the growth in treatment, or that patients got inadequate treatment. It also is possible antidepressants are not good at reducing suicidal behavior, even when prescribed correctly.

The analysis was based on a recent survey of 9,708 adults and a comparable survey in the early 1990s. It was primarily funded by the National Institute of Mental Health.

Source http://www.ahrp.org/infomail/05/06/09.php
 

 
October 26, 2005, 8:26 am CDT

Psychopharmacological Drug Advisory Meetings

Thought this would be of interest even though the meetings are being held yesterday and today (Oct. 25-26).  (See http://www.fda.gov/oc/advisory/accalendar/2005/cder12544dd10252605.html.)  At least we can keep our eyes and ears open to hear what happens :-).  I sent a letter to the contact person anyway and although I didn't hear back from her yet, I did get a response from the contact person, Igor Cerny, for the Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science also holding meetings yesterday and today (see http://www.fda.gov/oc/advisory/accalendar/2005/cder12539dd10252605.html.)   

There will be a Clinical Pharmacology Subcommitte of the Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science meetings Nov 14-15 in Rockville, MD.  (See
http://www.fda.gov/oc/advisory/accalendar/2005/cder12539dd11141505.html).  I sent a letter and my story to that contact person too and recommend anyone who feels compelled to do the same :-). 

All say they are open to the public and will have time for the public to speak although that seems very limited of course :-(.  They are also accepting written submissions (Due by Nov. 4 to Mimi Phan at phanm@cder.fda.gov.)  See the site for more info.  Once again if we all ban together we will make a difference! :P 

I found this by going to http://www.fda.gov/cder/ then to the CDER (Center for Drug Evaluation and Research) Calendar and clicking on Advisory Meetings.  I got this link after sending a letter and my story on to a whole list of FDA officals via email addresses a while ago that I got from www.drugawareness.org.  I am not saying that I trust what they do at the FDA, just remembering that those who testified and gave their personal accounts of the harm the SSRI's did to their children were instrumental in getting the black box warnings on the label to help protect our children and now there are studies coming out that the percentage of prescriptions to the under 18 group has gone down...Halleluiah!  Each step towards the goal is something....  

 
October 26, 2005, 1:14 pm CDT

Not just kids are overmedicated

I am a pharmacist and am amazed at the amount of prescriptions that we dispense.  I really wonder how many of them are truly necessary.  I am planning on quiting because I am so frustrated with people's attitude towards medications and the whole health care industry in America.  Everyone complains about the cost of health care but no one really tries to do anything.  There is a lot of blame placed on drug companies because their products are so highly priced.  However, I do not feel they have any blame in this.  The general attitude in America is that if something is medically wrong with us give us a pill.  Antibiotics are over prescribed leading to resistance all because people demand then for themselves or their children when they aren't really needed and doctors give it to them.  So drug companies have to keep developing newer antibiotics that work differently so that we can still demand that pill when we are sick, this cost money.  When someone gets diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol they want a pill so they can continue their unhealthy habits and "fix" the problem.  If Americans would lead healthier lives it would greatly reduce the need for medications and greatly reduce the health care costs in America.  Yes, I feel kids are over-medicated and the sad part is they don't choose it.  But if Americans would change their lifestyles and their attitude towards medications,  it could change many things that are wrong with health care today.  Instead of trying to find out what's truly wrong, people want a "quick fix" for the symptoms so they can go on without any changes.  But this only fixes symptoms it does nothing to fix the problem.  And most people don't realize that all drugs have side effects.  People feel taking drugs or giving them to their children is without risk and that is untrue.  Drugs can be helpful, but should not be treated like candy.
 
October 28, 2005, 6:55 am CDT

I agree with you 100%!

Quote From: sherbear19

I am a pharmacist and am amazed at the amount of prescriptions that we dispense.  I really wonder how many of them are truly necessary.  I am planning on quiting because I am so frustrated with people's attitude towards medications and the whole health care industry in America.  Everyone complains about the cost of health care but no one really tries to do anything.  There is a lot of blame placed on drug companies because their products are so highly priced.  However, I do not feel they have any blame in this.  The general attitude in America is that if something is medically wrong with us give us a pill.  Antibiotics are over prescribed leading to resistance all because people demand then for themselves or their children when they aren't really needed and doctors give it to them.  So drug companies have to keep developing newer antibiotics that work differently so that we can still demand that pill when we are sick, this cost money.  When someone gets diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol they want a pill so they can continue their unhealthy habits and "fix" the problem.  If Americans would lead healthier lives it would greatly reduce the need for medications and greatly reduce the health care costs in America.  Yes, I feel kids are over-medicated and the sad part is they don't choose it.  But if Americans would change their lifestyles and their attitude towards medications,  it could change many things that are wrong with health care today.  Instead of trying to find out what's truly wrong, people want a "quick fix" for the symptoms so they can go on without any changes.  But this only fixes symptoms it does nothing to fix the problem.  And most people don't realize that all drugs have side effects.  People feel taking drugs or giving them to their children is without risk and that is untrue.  Drugs can be helpful, but should not be treated like candy.

You know....I think that it is very very sad that people in our country are being forced into changing careers that they were once passionate about due to frustration & discust over this subject. There has been many teachers as well that have given up their profession because they didn't agree with the "mind altering" drugging of children. In some schools there are over 65% of children on highly addictive & seriously dangerous drugs! Years ago I seen a program on Dateline about an elementary school in Virginia where at a certain time every day a huge line of children would line up down the hallway for their daily Ritalin fix! It was one of the most disturbing things I've ever seen & has stuck in my mind ever since. These poor little kids looked like little zombies standing in line. They had no emotion on their face....they just stood there standing perfectly still in line with their hands at their sides. It made me cry & I can't get that picture out of my mind.  These poor kids didn't choose to be like this! Children are pure & innocent....how can they get away with making them suffer like this???? 

  

I am thankful that I have found wonderful doctors for my daughter. They are very cautious about prescribing antibiotics....warning about resistance if taken when unnecassary. She suffered from many ear infections when she was younger & even though she had a history of them, the doctors still persisted that she come in for an exam before they would prescribe her any medications. It is ashame that more doctors are not this cautious. I do agree that drugs should not be treated as candy but at the same time you have to blame all the doctors that promote & prescribe the drugs! Without the doctors prescription....this problem wouldn't exist! There is do doubt that there is enormous profit made in the drug industry & the average every day people are the ones having to pay the price for it! It is nice that while the CEO's of huge drug companies are swimming in money.......we are struggling to be able to afford health insurance for our families! 

  

I commend you for giving up your profession for something that you believe in & I wish you all the luck with your future endeavors! 

 
October 28, 2005, 9:57 pm CDT

Thank you for being a pharmacist

Quote From: sherbear19

I am a pharmacist and am amazed at the amount of prescriptions that we dispense.  I really wonder how many of them are truly necessary.  I am planning on quiting because I am so frustrated with people's attitude towards medications and the whole health care industry in America.  Everyone complains about the cost of health care but no one really tries to do anything.  There is a lot of blame placed on drug companies because their products are so highly priced.  However, I do not feel they have any blame in this.  The general attitude in America is that if something is medically wrong with us give us a pill.  Antibiotics are over prescribed leading to resistance all because people demand then for themselves or their children when they aren't really needed and doctors give it to them.  So drug companies have to keep developing newer antibiotics that work differently so that we can still demand that pill when we are sick, this cost money.  When someone gets diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol they want a pill so they can continue their unhealthy habits and "fix" the problem.  If Americans would lead healthier lives it would greatly reduce the need for medications and greatly reduce the health care costs in America.  Yes, I feel kids are over-medicated and the sad part is they don't choose it.  But if Americans would change their lifestyles and their attitude towards medications,  it could change many things that are wrong with health care today.  Instead of trying to find out what's truly wrong, people want a "quick fix" for the symptoms so they can go on without any changes.  But this only fixes symptoms it does nothing to fix the problem.  And most people don't realize that all drugs have side effects.  People feel taking drugs or giving them to their children is without risk and that is untrue.  Drugs can be helpful, but should not be treated like candy.

I just want to say that I don't think being a pharmacist is a bad profession. The only person who ever admitted to me that Zoloft was causing my symptoms was the pharmacist at Target. I asked her after I read the label that said to tell your doctor if you have thoughts of violence or suicide... etc. and she said, yes it does cause that in at least 1% of patients and told me to switch meds. While I thank her for that advice I don't think there is another med that would have helped me without causing those symptoms as all SSRIs have those known side effects, and I was not going to try an antipsychotic that specifically precluded nursing. 

I just want to say also that I think that a pharmacist sometimes can give you much better advice than a doctor and they are not so invested in the decision making process so they are more objective. 

I am thankful for pharmacists and the information they provide. They can't help it what prescriptions are written, they are there to help the patients understand them. 

 
November 14, 2005, 1:49 pm CST

09/28 Overmedicating America: The Cruise Controversy

Quote From: fastjdr

 I just have a question to all.  When you are walking through a store and see a child out of control what is your first thought?  I would probably say that many of you will answer "those parents don't have control of their kids".  I don't think not one of you can say you would think that there is a medical problem that needs attention or medication.  I don't believe in overmedicating, but I do believe in medication to control things.  I have an 8yr old son right now that has been diagnosed with ADHD by his school and doctor.  The one thing I do know is that his school work has improved and his behavior there also.  Right now we have him on Concerta that he takes in the morning and Stratera that he takes befroe bed.  Our doctor also gave us a small dose of Ritalin to give him when he has activities at night, but I must say I have a hard time giving it to him.  I think it is an easy way out.  But back to the question, honestly ask yourself, do you think you would ask the parents if there is a medical condition they have and that you comend them for not using medicine?  Or are you the type that would say you don't think there should be medication, but yet asume that those parents are bad parents and cant control their kids.  Bottom line, I think each case deserves its own specific type of control.  What gives you the right to say that about someone that is trying to help their kid when you would be the firtst to see them in a store or other public place and ridicule thier parents for not being good parents.  Does this mean you don't believe in any type of medical problem?
My son has been diagnosed with this as well.  I would like to ask you a question about his medication because I'm having problems with his dr right now with getting his medication right.  I was just interested in why they prescribed Concerta and Stratera at the same time...My son was very anxious and depressed on the stimulants, and the Stratera seemed to work for a bit, but just seemed to wear off.  I'm at a total loss here...the dr just wants me to take him to have a psych eval done, but I feel that would only be in an extreme instance and I haven't had anything extreme happen.  He's just a seven year old boy, I don't want his to have any more problems than he's already been dealt....my e-mail is lllibby44@yahoo.com is you have any good advice.  Thanks.
 
November 16, 2005, 4:08 pm CST

09/28 Overmedicating America: The Cruise Controversy

Quote From: leiah44

My son has been diagnosed with this as well.  I would like to ask you a question about his medication because I'm having problems with his dr right now with getting his medication right.  I was just interested in why they prescribed Concerta and Stratera at the same time...My son was very anxious and depressed on the stimulants, and the Stratera seemed to work for a bit, but just seemed to wear off.  I'm at a total loss here...the dr just wants me to take him to have a psych eval done, but I feel that would only be in an extreme instance and I haven't had anything extreme happen.  He's just a seven year old boy, I don't want his to have any more problems than he's already been dealt....my e-mail is lllibby44@yahoo.com is you have any good advice.  Thanks.

Concerta and Ritalin are the same substance, the only difference is Concerta comes in a caplet that is designed to be released slowly over the 12 hours rather than all at once hitting the blood stream and then wearing off gradually. 

Why does the doctor want a psych evaluation? Is it to rule out whether he needs meds, or to correct the dose? A lot of primary docs don't want to take responsibility for managing dose adjustments for psychiatric meds. 

That having been said, there are a lot of kids who have been harmed by drugs and the incidence of diagnosis of ADHD has increased proportionally with the incentives paid to schools for having students in their SPED program and with increased employment of school psychologists and "testing specialists" (SPED includes gifted programs, LD, emotionally disturbed or anyone in any sort of enrichment class or taking a drug and receiving treatment from school counselors.) 

  

These medications cause brain damage and have killed children with long term use. 

In addition, last month the FDA voted against a proposal that drug companies conduct long term studies on drugs (ie longer than 4 or 6 weeks). 

  

For more information, please email me at amyphilo@yahoo.com 

Or go to www.chaada.org or http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/chaada/ 

  

 
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