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Topic : 01/24 Dreams, Nightmares and Night Terrors

Number of Replies: 158
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Created on : Friday, January 20, 2006, 03:03:18 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1

Dr. Phil's guests scream, punch, fight and even eat — all while they're sleeping. They suffer from nightmares, sleep terrors and other disorders that are destroying their lives. Scott's sleepwalking and sleep terrors have gotten so dangerous that he has attempted to smother his wife, Heather, with a pillow, has walked outside shirtless in freezing weather, and has even kicked Heather in the stomach when she was pregnant. Heather is not only concerned for her safety, but also for the safety of their two small kids. Then, Nathalie has been plagued by the same gruesome nightmare for 20 years, and worries that she's losing her sanity. What's behind these recurring dreams? Plus, Angela has been eating in her sleep for the past 15 years. She wakes up to find chocolate on her clothes, food wrappers in her bed — even tuna casserole on her fingers! Dr. Phil has advice for putting these sleep disorders to bed.  Join the discussion.

 

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January 24, 2006, 12:34 pm CST

fears

i know how all the guest feel.  i have the same nightmares that some of the guest have. i'm a mother and my fears are that my mental state will hurt my son.  he is only 8months old. my dream is that a little girl with no face looking at herself die. people tell her you are not worth anything we never want you we should have let you go.  you should be sorry about being alive and breathing for even walking.  my husband is the rock that keeps me together.  i hope that this don't pass these dreams to my son. what do you think? 

  

  

                                                                     love, 

                                                                            a crazy mom 

 
January 24, 2006, 12:42 pm CST

My Husband has night terrors

Hi there, 

  

I have been with my husband for about 6 years now.   Almost every night he has a night terror.  They involve him jolting up in bed and running to the bathroom to dislodge something in his throat that he is choking on.  These things can range from something as small as a key to something as large as an animal, like a raccoon. 

  

Over the years we have had some positive progress in helping him with this problem.  Sometimes I am able to wake him up from his deep sleep by rubbing his back and just talking to him and telling him it's just a dream.  Other times he snaps himself out of it by telling himself it's just a dream.  We have even had him talk to a psychiatrist and he attributed his dreams to asthma, which we are not convinced of that. 

 

He has been having these dreams since he was a young boy.  He is now 35.  I know we would both love it if these dreams would stop, but do not know what we can do to make it happen. 

 

If anyone out there has any suggestions on how we can try to get control of these night terrors, it would be greatly appreciated. 

 
January 24, 2006, 12:45 pm CST

Son has had night terrors

My son is currently 2 1/2 years old. When he was just under 2 years old he started having crying fits during the night. Usually they would stop on their own and he would fall asleep again. I usually wouldnt even go into his room, i didnt think much of it. Just that something woke him he was a little upset and fell back asleep. He had been sleeping through the night since he was 3 months old with out any trouble untill this. Then about 3 months ago i heard him SCREAM at aboiut 1 am like someone/thing was attacking him. I ran into his room to find him running backwards away from his bed arms extended screaming his head off. I picked him up and carried him out to the living room. He had no clue I was even there. After a few minutes he looked up at me said hi and asked me for a drink. Like nothing at all had happened. He had his drink and went back to bed. 4 other times that night this happened. And every night that week between 1 and 3am he had this happen at least once. I did some reasearch online and everything pionited towards night terrors. I put a night light in his room as one of the pages suggested and did alot of praying and he hasnt had anything this severe for about 2 months now. Im wondering if he is ok now or is there a chance that this will continue untill hes an adult and become as bad as some of the people on the show.
 
January 24, 2006, 12:46 pm CST

It's about time!

I'm glad  more attention is being given to these disorders. When I studied sleep disorders in college I was suprised at how unknown this was. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, cataplexy, night terrors, nightmares are all serious problems that in my opinon are taken less seriously but can cause such distressing problems. I work in healthcare and now I see more sleep centers being included in regular medical practices.

I remember one case a prof. told our class about. A young man in his late teens/early 20s was having trouble dating, and had confidence problems. He couldn't figure out why until he went to a psychologist who suggested he see a sleep specialist. His trouble would always occur during sex. He would remember being in bed with a woman, then the next thing he knew she was gone! It turned out he had narcolepsy (disorder which makes you fall asleep) and the trigger was sexual excitement. Right before climax he would fall asleep. He didn't know he was doing it, but he suffered because of it and no one would date him. Through working with a sleep specialist and psychiatrist, he learned to control his sleep patterns.
 
January 24, 2006, 12:55 pm CST

Non-REM Parasomnia

My husband and I have been coping with Non-REM parasomnia for years together.  He has done things such as choke me in his sleep, throw me against the wall, and punch me while he was flailing his arms.  He even stepped on a fan, that cut him 2 inches into his foot, and still did not wake up.  I had to aggressively wake him and let him know that he was bleeding everywhere. 

  

Unfortunately, parasomnia is not widely known and there is very little research that has gone into it.  My husband was misdiagnosed in a sleep institute in our home state with RBD, Rapid Eye Movement Behavioral Disorder, which has been linked to Parkinson's disease.  We decided to go for the second opinion in Minnesota where he was diagnosed with Non REM parasomnia, a much more benign form of parasomnia (as long as he takes his medicine).  He was at the Minnesota Sleep Disorders Institute for a 3 day and night study.  It as well worth it.    

  

Since our visit, two and a half years ago, my husband will have a night terror once every 3-6 months now, as opposed to every night.  He is currently taking an anti-seize drug called Clonopin (sp) and has shown remarkable improvement.  I trust him with our baby and I allow him to sleep in the same room with me.  I honestly feel that I no longer have to sleep "with one eye open".    

 
January 24, 2006, 12:59 pm CST

Dreams Happen when he's not home

Quote From: monica27

  Sometimes I do have night terrors.  Most of them are about, the BTK killer I dreamed that he was in my house and was trying to kill me.. Also some of the deams are when my fiance leaves for work he gone for at least 2 weeks..  I dreamed that someone broke in and was trying to rape me.  I really don't know why I have these deams.  Some times I wake up yelling.  Most of the dreams happen when he is not at home.. What do these mean?  Monica
 Hi Monica,
I'm not a pro by any means, but it sounds like to me that you are insecure with being alone.  I have no idea how to fix your problem but you might want to think of getting some type of security system installed in your home or a big dog.  Have you been alone before?
 
January 24, 2006, 1:05 pm CST

Night Terrors

Quote From: agtemt

My son is currently 2 1/2 years old. When he was just under 2 years old he started having crying fits during the night. Usually they would stop on their own and he would fall asleep again. I usually wouldnt even go into his room, i didnt think much of it. Just that something woke him he was a little upset and fell back asleep. He had been sleeping through the night since he was 3 months old with out any trouble untill this. Then about 3 months ago i heard him SCREAM at aboiut 1 am like someone/thing was attacking him. I ran into his room to find him running backwards away from his bed arms extended screaming his head off. I picked him up and carried him out to the living room. He had no clue I was even there. After a few minutes he looked up at me said hi and asked me for a drink. Like nothing at all had happened. He had his drink and went back to bed. 4 other times that night this happened. And every night that week between 1 and 3am he had this happen at least once. I did some reasearch online and everything pionited towards night terrors. I put a night light in his room as one of the pages suggested and did alot of praying and he hasnt had anything this severe for about 2 months now. Im wondering if he is ok now or is there a chance that this will continue untill hes an adult and become as bad as some of the people on the show.
I have done a whole lot of research on night terrors and sleep disorders of this nature.  When a child has night terrors, they will most likely outgrow them.  I feel that it is almost considered normal for a child to have some sort of sleep-walking tendancies.  I think that the problem is when the terrors start later in life.  Good luck, and I hope your child outgrows these scary things!  
 
January 24, 2006, 1:12 pm CST

asthma hmmmm

Quote From: monette

Hi there, 

  

I have been with my husband for about 6 years now.   Almost every night he has a night terror.  They involve him jolting up in bed and running to the bathroom to dislodge something in his throat that he is choking on.  These things can range from something as small as a key to something as large as an animal, like a raccoon. 

  

Over the years we have had some positive progress in helping him with this problem.  Sometimes I am able to wake him up from his deep sleep by rubbing his back and just talking to him and telling him it's just a dream.  Other times he snaps himself out of it by telling himself it's just a dream.  We have even had him talk to a psychiatrist and he attributed his dreams to asthma, which we are not convinced of that. 

 

He has been having these dreams since he was a young boy.  He is now 35.  I know we would both love it if these dreams would stop, but do not know what we can do to make it happen. 

 

If anyone out there has any suggestions on how we can try to get control of these night terrors, it would be greatly appreciated. 

 Hmmm, that's odd.  I will say that both me and my son have asthma and we both talk in our sleep.  I used to walk in my sleep as well, but as I grew older I stopped walking and just kept talking.  So, asthma might have a part in this, but to have the feeling of something in his throat is rather odd.  When he awakes from him dreams is he having problems breathing?  If so, it might help for him to sleep with an extra pillow or two.  I know I breath better when I am having asthma problems if I have an extra pillow to prop my head on. 

Does your husband still have his adenoids?  I know when you are sleeping if you have enlarged adenoids that will cause problems with sleep.  In-fact it can stop you from breathing and cause you to choke or even worse.  Has he spoke to his regular doctor about this or only his psychiatrist? 
 
January 24, 2006, 1:14 pm CST

01/24 Dreams, Nightmares and Night Terrors

Quote From: doumissme2

I'm excited to see this show.  My daughter started with night tears at 18 months old. It's was horrible.  These went on until age 2 1/2. Took her to her doctor and he recommended taking her to someone who was more qualified. That speciliast told us he felt her night terrors were from ADHD but the only way to determine if she had ADHD was through a Brain Specht.  That was done and it confirmed was he suspected.  She had a severe case of ADHD and that was a good part of her night tears.  It will be interesting tomorrow if the words ADHD or ADD come up. So many people are in denial about ADHD/ADD when they do NOT have to be.
My daughter too has ADHD.  She too wakes up very frequently.  Sometimes it's from nightmares, and other times she sleep walks.  Sometime with her sleep walking, she can carry on a normal conversation, and other times it's a bunch of words or noises that don't make sense at all.  Were you told how the ADHD contributes to the sleep disorder?  Well I guess it makes sense that it's contributed to unfinished business throughout the day.  I know with my daughter, she goes a 100mph.  But, I too would like more info on sleep disorders and ADHD children.  And how they are connected, and what options there are to help. 
 
January 24, 2006, 1:19 pm CST

Monosodium glutimate causes night terrors

I had night terrors throughout my childhood. No one knew why I would get up during the night and walk around the house as though I was completely awake. Finally, my mother started writing down everything I ate, and she narrowed the problem down to MSG, monosodium glutimate. When we cut that out of my diet, the nightmares went away. I have never had another nightmare since those times. Of course, the doctors did not believe that it could have actually been something I was eating that caused the problem. All of you whose children suffer from night terrors might consider looking at what your child eats before you put them on any medication for different disorders that they might not actually have.
 
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